Forget Disneyland – Sedona Is The Happiest Place On Earth

Sedona, Arizona. A sweet little 7 hour drive from Los Angeles, or a quick flight from LAX and puddle jumper from Phoenix. I’d heard about the healing powers of this magical destination but I didn’t know much beyond a Google search.

To celebrate my birthday and commemorate the end of my cancer journey, I booked a trip to Sedona for 3 nights and started researching different vortex excursions. What’s a vortex? Glad you asked. According to VisitSedona.com, it’s “Believed to be a special spot on the earth where energy is either entering into the earth or projecting out of the earth’s plane. Vortexes (or vortices) are found at sacred sites throughout the world – the Great Pyramid in Egypt, Machu Picchu in Peru, Bali, Stonehenge, etc. It is believed that the vortex energy moves in a spiral, moving up or down.”

There are several types of excursions you can check out – jeep tours, yoga sessions, guided mediations, balloon rides, ATV rentals, and much more. I sank into a digital wormhole of reviews, photos, and explanations about the endless options, and found a company called Sedona Red Rock Tours. Their Reiki On The Rocks and Chakra Tour hikes sounded enticing so I reserved a couple spots and bought some cute yoga pants because I wanted to look cute for my 12 Instagram followers.

Yes, I’m having a spiritual epiphany, but more importantly, do you like my outfit?

The drive from L.A. was tolerable, especially with ample snacks and Starbucks pit stops. As you approach Sedona, the scenery morphs from boring freeway stretches into shapely cacti and stunning rock formations. You can practically feel the energy shift and the monotony from your car ride transforms into giddiness.

The Enchantment Resort was true to its name. The winding driveway gave me a sense of seclusion, but an adorable group of deer by the check-in area reminded me that you’re never truly alone in nature. A strapping young Enchantment employee escorted me to my “casita” in a golf cart and my shrieks of excitement startled a few of the resident fawns. 

My casita came fully furnished with fabulousness. The kitchen had a fridge, microwave, and stove. The cabinets were stocked with plates, silverware, and glassware. I’d love to host a dinner party here, but I doubt my friends would drive 7 hours to watch me burn our dinner and accidentally set the place on fire.

The table and chairs stood under a chandelier with crystals hanging from each arm. The kitchen opened up to a huge living room with a fireplace, couch, queen-sized bed, and balcony that boasted the most picturesque view I’ve ever seen.

I could’ve easily taken 1,000 photos and Instagrammed the night away, but I needed some nosh. I bellied up to the bar at Tii Gavo, Enchantment’s resident “gathering place.” The Prickly Pear Margarita was so tasty and tart, I had to restrain myself from immediately ordering 6 more. Their Yavapai Salad (avocado, piquillo peppers, corn queso panella, and green chile ranch dressing) delighted my taste buds and gave a new definition to the word “yum.”

With a full belly and glass of wine, I tucked into bed with Netflix. I soon nodded off, comfy and content in my casita. A few hours later, I woke up to a weird sound. Um, was that a ghost? An animal on the roof? I was too scared to get out of bed so I stared at the ceiling for awhile and tried not to freak out. Once the sun came up, I walked over to Mii Amo (sister property to Enchantment) and scarfed down the best egg white omelette of my life. I washed it down with the best almond milk latte of my life, and 2 funky ginger turmeric shots.

Woo, shots during breakfast! (Relax, Mom, these are alcohol-free.)

After breakfast, I discovered a rad little room off the Mii Amo lobby. A crystal grotto. A small, quiet space to set your intentions for the day and release any tensions or anxieties. Perfect! I sat in there for awhile and I noticed an interesting tingle in my feet. Too much caffeine? Or maybe the positive energy coursing through my body? I’d like to think it was the vortex, working its magic.

 

 

 

 

 

My first excursion was Reiki On The Rocks. Chris from Red Rock Tours picked me up and we chatted about why I was in Sedona, and what I hoped to get out of today’s adventure. He brought me to a nearby vortex, Airport Mesa, and we hiked uphill for about 10 minutes. I kept stopping to take in the beauty surrounding us and I felt a child-like sense of awe. We sat down toward the edge and did some breathing exercises. He started spritzing me with homemade smudge spray, a blend of essential oils like eucalyptus, cedar leaf and juniper berry (which smelled so good that I later purchased a bottle). We meditated for several minutes and I tried to concentrate on the sights, sounds, and smells around us, while letting go of the noisy chatter running through my brain.

Chris then drove us to a nearby picnic area and we had our reiki session. Again I tried to be present in the moment but all I could think was, “Am I breathing too loud? Too fast? Too slow?” Eventually I relaxed and quieted my mind. Chris suggested we watch the sunset and I couldn’t recall the last time I felt this chill.

The next day, I was scheduled for the Sedona Red Rock Chakra Tour. I knocked back 2 scrumptious cups of coffee on my beautiful balcony and met Jared, my tour guide, in the lobby. I gave him the same spiel that I gave Chris yesterday (“I have anxiety and I can’t sleep and I’m worried about the state of our country and cancer was scary and I forgot to run the dishwasher before I left…”) and we drove toward the vortex, an amused look on Jared’s face.

He brought us to Bell Rock and we started with some gentle yoga. Even though the poses were super easy, I kept toppling over and my thighs shook during every stretch. Jared was polite and didn’t laugh at my lack of skill. We then proceeded with a guided meditation and this is when I experienced a very cool revelation.

Jared had me lie down and close my eyes and said to envision myself on a beach, with ocean waves softly lapping over my legs. As I listened to his voice and focused on the sounds of birds chirping, the sensation of the gentle breeze, and the warmth of the sun on my face, I suddenly realized, “OH…this is what it means to live in the moment. To be present and appreciate everything around you.” I shared this with Jared, and he said that I have the ability to feel this way all the time. Woh. I’ll have to keep this in mind next time I have Level 10 Road Rage in Los Angeles, which will probably happen during the drive back home.

After my rad epiphany, we trekked over to Rachel’s Knoll, a striking property that overlooks a golf course. Jared was an encyclopedia of knowledge, pointing out the names of every bush and tree that we passed. He gave me a nontoxic berry to eat and although it was pretty, it was very bitter (which is what people probably say about me). As we walked, we delved into the mental and emotional stresses that I’m working through, and Jared helped me understand that all my doubts, uncertainties, and insecurities have one thing in common – they’re all rooted in fear. So instead of stressing about 100 different things, I need to adjust my outlook so that I don’t live in a constant state of anxiety. Jared is smart.

If I face away from the camera, you can’t tell that I’m deathly afraid of heights.

I got back to my casita and wanted to revel in my newfound fulfillment. I meandered over to Tii Gavo again and scanned their selection of top-shelf whiskeys. My eyes landed on a seductive bottle, one that I’ve seldom seen in bars but has caught my attention online. Pappy Van Winkle 15 Year. 85 bucks a glass. I figured that I deserved a reward for all my spiritual growth, so I ignored a pang of guilt about spending that much on one drink and thoroughly enjoyed my overpriced elixir.

I got a solid night’s sleep, and decided to make the most of my final morning in this mountainside paradise. I squeezed in a quick hike up Boynton Canyon, right outside of Enchantment. Without a tour guide, I went at a much slower pace and sat down several times to stare at the cool twisted trees. The terrain got a little dicey toward the top, but I scurried up as far as I could go. My feet got really tingly and I meditated for about 10 minutes. With a great mellow vibe, I trotted back down the canyon and grabbed a smoothie at Mii Amo. It was time to pack and bid adieu to my casita.

And right behind this rock…nirvana.

I reluctantly left Enchantment and grabbed brunch at a cute little spot called The Secret Garden. My patio table overlooked a garden (duh) and each table had a blanket to keep customers warm and snuggly during their meal. I ordered a Bloody Mary, a cappuccino, and a water so I could cover all my basic beverage groups. My server told me that she’d visited Sedona in 2007, then she  later came back for a few days, then for a week…then she moved here for good.

Part of my complete breakfast.

Wanting to delay my departure as long as possible, I then popped into a local bookstore. I bought some candles, books, keychains, and a necklace with a small bottle of red rock sand (this way I could bring a teeny part of the magic home with me). As I paid for everything and struck up a conversation with the cashier, a woman overheard us and came over to tell me that my story really resonated with her. She said she could feel my positive energy and asked for a hug. We embraced for a moment and I left Sedona with a huge smile on my face, and in my soul.

During the drive home, as the mountains and cacti faded into the background, I reflected on the mysticism of my weekend. I felt happier, healthier, and better equipped to deal with life’s obstacles and hurdles. And as I gripped my sweet new necklace, turning the small bottle of sand over and over in my hand, I realized that maybe, just maybe, the magic is inside me.

Chemo Supremo: 10 Truths I Discovered During Chemotherapy

“We’re going to start chemo next Friday.”

Those words still haunt me. I was sick with fear, sitting in a little room at Cedars Sinai with my family and my rock star oncologist. I had just gotten the worst news of my life (more on that here), and now I was told that we’d begin chemo treatments in just 7 days. 7 days?! That wouldn’t be nearly enough time to digest this horrendous news! I wanted at least a few weeks to wallow in self-pity (and stress-eat a hundred boxes of Girl Scout cookies).

But one week from that day, I would begin pumping poison into my body to attack the nasty little tumors that had taken up residence throughout my belly. One week from that day, I’d have to watch my hair fall out, watch my teeth disintegrate, watch my nails fall off, and watch my body slowly deteriorate. Or so I thought.

Everything I knew about chemo I’d learned from movies, the Hallmark Channel, and Sex & The City. I figured that the chemo ward would consist of one big open room, where the patients sit next to each other, crying, vomiting, and meeting eyes with that, “Can you believe this sh**?” expression.

My perception was way off.

I was shaking and terrified going into my first chemo sesh. I had brought 2 sets of comfy clothes, books, an iPad, snacks, lunch, water, my laptop, and a pillow. The nurses were amused by how much I’d overpacked. A couple hours into that initial appointment, I began to relax and saw that chemo wouldn’t be as bad as I had anticipated.

18 sessions later, here’s what I discovered…

1) It’s more uneventful than you think.
You know those days when you stay home from work with the flu? The ones where you make a fresh dent in the couch from binge-watching Netflix? Chemo is kinda like that, except you’re in a soft chair (or bed) and hooked up to a loud beepy machine. It’s sorta relaxing, sorta boring, and very uneventful. My iPad got lots of use as I plowed through Weeds, Nurse Jackie, Silicon Valley, Ray Donovan, then Silicon Valley again.

2) It doesn’t hurt.
In fact, you don’t really feel anything. Except maybe sleepiness. At the beginning of each treatment, you’re given a small cocktail of drugs (usually a steroid, an anti-nausea medication, and something to help you mellow out – for me it was Benadryl or Ativan). But I never experienced any pain or discomfort.

3) Your nurses are heroes.
Not all heroes wear capes, but they do wear scrubs. I quickly became infatuated with the guys and gals that took care of me during those dreary days. We cracked jokes. We laughed. We talked about my cats. They showed me iPhone pics of their dogs. Without their constant cheeriness, my ordeal would have been a whole lot darker.

4) Costumes make it fun.
Well, maybe not fun, but certainly less scary. I mean, can you really be scared of something while you’re wearing a coconut bra? Or rocking a tiara? Or a vampire cape? Other patients would come to my bay and tell me they loved my outfits. Costumes made me smile, and they lightened the mood for everyone. 

5) It’s not nearly as depressing as it’s depicted on TV.
Before this whole adventure, I envisioned the chemo ward as a sad space filled with feelings of desperation, hopelessness, and bad snacks. Thankfully, it was the opposite of that. The snacks were good. And the ward was full of kindness, empathy, and positivity. Everyone there is doing everything in their power to help you heal. Oh, and did I mention therapy dogs!?

6) Everyone reacts differently to the side effects.
There are a lot of variables that determine how your body will handle chemo. Your age, your health, your cancer type, your chemo type, and so on. I’d been worried that my nails would fall off, my teeth would fall out, and I’d morph into a frail fragile little mess (note to self: stay away from the blogosphere). But thankfully, other than some nausea, hair loss, and strange pains, nothing too bizarre took place.

7) The worst thing to fear is fear itself.
When I got my diagnosis, I had 3 major fears: shaving my head, having surgery, and enduring my first chemo session. But when it was time to bid adieu to my hair, my stylist blasted some girl power tunes and we made it fun. When it was time for surgery, I rocked a rainbow wig and took some hilarious selfies. And when it was time for my initial chemo appointment, I befriended all the nurses and giggled my way through the day. I realized that all my fears were unfounded and there was really nothing to be afraid of.

8) It affects you mentally.
I was totally prepared for the physical side effects of chemo, but I wasn’t prepared for the mental ones. I woke up one morning and the world seemed bleak and gray and I wondered if I’d ever feel happiness or fulfillment again. All I could focus on was the dullness and negativity soaring through my mind. After many boxes of tissues and phone calls with my mom, the rain clouds disintegrated and my sunny demeanor peeked through once again. 

9) It’ll be over before you know it.
Back in April, I thought this would be the longest year of my life. That the days would tick by painfully slowly. And sometimes they did. But soon a week went by, then 2 weeks, then a month, then a few months. I tried to pack in as much fun as I could, like movies, a new pair of shoes, dinners with friends, and afternoon walks. And then BOOM – you’re in the home stretch.  

10) When you’re finally finished, it’s the best feeling in the world…and also one of the weirdest.
During treatment, you feel a sense of safety. You have doctors and nurses and hospital staff surrounding you all the time. Then once you complete your final chemo session, you start to wonder, “Now what? Do I just sit back and hope that cancer never comes back?” It’s a strange transition. You go from feeling sheltered to feeling exposed. Some days are riddled with anxiety and some are riddled with Thin Mints cookies. But all of them are days worth living.

What It’s Like Getting The Worst News Of Your Life

All my life I’ve wondered what it’s like to get “the news.” The bad news. The scary news. The news that changes your life forever. The news you hope you’ll never have to hear.

I’ve seen it on the Lifetime channel and in plenty of films. The moment where a terrified person sits across from a doctor and his fate is sealed with one sentence.

“You have cancer.”

And I always carefully watched the face of the poor sap who’s getting the news, thinking, “How would I react if that happened to me? What would it feel like?”

Well, now I know.

I’ve been keeping a diary to chronicle my cancer journey and I wanted to share the entries from the week surrounding my diagnosis. I find solace in sharing my experience and hope that it may help someone going through the same ordeal.

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Thursday April 6, 2017

PANICKING. Was getting into the shower this morning, and something is very very very wrong. I’ve lost a little weight recently because I gave up dairy and was mostly eating a plant-based diet, but I looked at myself as I got into the shower and noticed that my abdomen had swelled up. Like, HUGE. Like, I looked 8 months pregnant. If I’ve lost weight and my pants are looser, why is my stomach this size? I’m worried.

Friday April 7, 2017

So I showed Jon my stomach, and he agrees that it’s not normal. He made some chicken noodle soup for dinner since I’m repulsed by most foods. But the soup tasted like dirt to me. He swore that it tasted fine, which I think means something in my body is seriously messed up, since my taste buds are now malfunctioning. We agreed that we’ll go to the emergency room tomorrow. Mom and Dad think it’s my gallbladder, so I hope they’re right.

Saturday April 8, 2017

Went into Cedars around 11am this morning. Didn’t have to wait long before I was in a comfy bed and watching infomercials. Bunch of tests during the day – blood, ultrasound, CT scan. The doctor on duty said it seemed like I passed a gallbladder stone, but they needed to make sure. After several hours, a nurse came in and said they needed to admit me into the hospital and I needed to go upstairs and put on a gown. But why? We were still waiting for the results of my CT scan. I didn’t understand and started to get anxious.

After I was admitted as a patient, I settled into my new room and sent Jon home to feed the cats. They hooked me up to an IV, which screeched a horrible alarm every time my arm bent. Ugh. I tried to get some sleep, but every time I drifted off, the alarm screeched me awake. I didn’t get more than 20 minutes of sleep at a time. And I STILL didn’t know why they were keeping me overnight. This sucks and I just want to go home.

Sunday April 9. 2017

At 8 in the morning, a woman came into my room and woke me up.

She quietly said, “We have the results of your CT scan, and you have ovarian cancer.”

Sorry, what? Wasn’t this supposed to be a gallbladder problem? I saw spots. Everything went white, and I saw black spots. The air was thick and wet. I don’t have cancer.

She was still staring at me and continued, “I know this is a lot of tough news…” but I couldn’t pay attention. I only saw her mouth move. It didn’t make any sense. I had no idea what to say, and eventually she left, probably to go drop this bomb on someone else.

I called Jon in tears, and he started crying on the phone, and said he would be by my side in 15 minutes. I then called my parents, sobbing. Alone. Terrified. How the F*** did this happen? How could I get the best news of my life a couple weeks ago (landing my book agent) followed by the worst?

Would I have 6 months to live? Would I die before my 50th birthday? My 40th? Jesus Christ, I’d never even been to Hawaii, gone skydiving, or owned a rescue dog!

Mom and Dad said they would come out next weekend to be with me. Between crying and hiccuping and panicking, I said they didn’t have to, but they insisted. Jon showed up and we sat together, scared and weeping.

That afternoon was a haze, but then the clouds parted and a magical man walked in. His name was Dr. Li. He was an ovarian cancer specialist, and he was my new doctor. His bedside manner was calm and confident. His voice washed over us like a soothing balm that we SO desperately needed. He said that yes, my CT scan did indicate that I could have ovarian cancer, but he was suspicious because I’m young and healthy, and there’s no history of cancer in my family, so it didn’t make sense.

Thankfully, the tumors had not spread to my lymph nodes, nor were they inside my organs. But those nasty little growths were on my ovaries, uterus,  liver and spleen (that explains those nagging pains in my upper abdomen), and scattered throughout my belly wall.

Dr. Li said that I would need to stay another night so that we could do a biopsy tomorrow, then we’ll know for sure what we’re dealing with. And that no matter what it is, he will help me get through this. What a relief to hear. I knew at that moment that Dr. Li is a precious gem and I started thinking about what to get him for Christmas. A framed photo of my ovaries, perhaps?

Monday April 10, 2017

Slept like garbage again. Every couple hours nurses were coming in and out, and I kept setting off the screechy IV alarm. Plus, I felt sick with nerves. And the worst part is that I couldn’t eat or drink after midnight. And anyone who knows me knows that I drink liters upon liters of water every day. I’m always kinda thirsty and water is my jam. But not being able to have any water was a new form of torture. My biopsy was supposed to be around 11am. So I watched the morning hours slowly tick by. Then it became noon. Then 1pm. Then 2pm. Then I was told that my biopsy wouldn’t be until 5pm. Ugh. My mouth was like sandpaper and not having water for 17 hours was (almost) worse than finding out you have cancer.

The biopsy itself was easy and quick. They told me to come back on Friday to meet with Dr. Li for the results. After I got dressed, I could FINALLY go home after two and a half days. What a freakin’ disaster.

It felt amazing to be home and smother my cats with love, but my mind was racing. Do I seriously have cancer?!

Tuesday April 11, 2017

I keep vacillating between, “There’s NO way I have cancer” and “Oh my God, I can’t believe I have cancer.” Work today was surreal. There’s a small bandage on my stomach where they took the biopsy, but the weird part is telling everyone what’s going on. I missed work yesterday, so they knew something was up, but reliving the past few days kinda sucked. I couldn’t even bring myself to say “ovarian cancer.” All I could muster was, “I’m hoping it’s not the big, scary thing.” But being at my desk is sort of helping me cope. Everyone is warm and sympathetic and we even cracked a few jokes. But my knees won’t stop shaking and I can’t eat anything and a thick omnipresent rope of fear has wrapped itself around my neck.

These tumors better be benign.

One good thing is that Mom, Dad, Rob, and Brian are all coming out this week! Thank God for my family. I’m beyond lucky to have them. And I’m so touched that they are all dropping everything to come be with me.

Friday April 14th, 2017

Armed with Jon and my family, we went to see Dr. Li for the results of my biopsy. While we were waiting, I kept praying that I had some strange new disease that made me grow benign tumors which could be cured with a lifetime of chocolate and whiskey. But alas, no such luck. Dr. Li came in and introduced himself to my family. He sat down and said that unfortunately, I did have ovarian cancer. Stage 3. I immediately broke down into tears, as did everyone else. No, no, NO!

Dr. Li’s adorable face was arranged into an expression of true empathy. He assured me that I WOULD beat this. I have age on my side. I’m active and healthy. My cancer will respond amazingly to chemotherapy and I will be cancer-free after this is done.

OH CRAP. It hadn’t really hit me that I would need chemo. My hair will fall out. My teeth will turn yellow. I’ll have purple bags under my eyes and I’ll look frail and sad and bald and old and crackly like the people you see on those cheesy Lifetime movies. 

Dr. Li recommended an aggressive treatment plan, with 9 consecutive weeks of chemo, then surgery (farewell, ovaries and uterus and possibly spleen), then 9 more consecutive weeks of chemo. So….basically the rest of this year is gonna suck. I don’t want to be bald.

Hmmm…with no ovaries or uterus, it will be difficult to conceive a child. Well, impossible, actually. Huh. So having children is officially off the table. I guess this’ll just be yet another crappy piece of information to accept and eventually make peace with. I suppose I could adopt, but I heard that’s super expensive. Wonder if I can put a baby on my Visa Rewards card?

The nurse practitioner, Corinna, gave me about 10,000 pieces of paperwork on everything from the side effects of chemo (yikes) to info on their psychology services (maybe necessary) to a list of Los Angeles wig-makers (definitely necessary) to a marijuana prescription (YEAH BABY).

After the meeting, we zipped back to the hotel because Rob had arrived. We all had a cocktail at the hotel bar, then went to dinner. It felt great to have the whole family together now and we shared the news with Rob. My food smelled good but tasted like dust. I just couldn’t believe it. It was real now. I have cancer in my body. 

Workin’ It: Hail To The Boss·some Leaders

bosssome

Boss·some
an amazing workplace leader; an awesome boss

Bloss
a mediocre workplace leader; a blah boss

As someone who’s thrived in excellent job environments and slogged away at unpleasant ones, I’ve reported to wonderful bosses (the kind you want to hug and impress) and horrid bosses (the kind you want to accidentally-on-purpose spill coffee on).

I know it’s difficult to be the guy in charge – you’ve gotta make tough decisions, you’re constantly under different types of pressure, and the livelihood of your employees depends on you. You deserve props for taking on the challenges of running a business.

clap

If you’ve ever been fortunate enough to have a rad boss, you know how good it feels. You want to work hard. You don’t mind going that extra mile to get things done. Heck, you don’t even mind taking his calls on the weekend, even though you threw back a coupla cocktails and you’re uncharacteristically enthusiastic about metrics and KPIs.

One such gentleman, a former supervisor of mine, rocked his Boss·some·ness like a custom pinstriped suit. He was supportive, kind, encouraging, and his habits taught me a lot about great leadership. Let’s examine why…

Mr. Boss·some made employees feel valued.
He asked for our input and listened to what we had to say. The first time it happened, I was suspicious that we were on a prank show. Then I realized that he actually cared about our opinions. Weird, eh?

Mr. Boss·some offered constructive criticism.
He helped me become a better writer by giving me helpful feedback and solid suggestions. I lapped it up like a thirst puppy.

Mr. Boss·some rocked at communication.
He always let us know what was going on in other departments, which helped us see the big picture and gave us a better understanding of the company’s mission and vision.

Mr. Boss·some let employees know when we did things right.
It’s not that I need a gold star placed on my forehead each morning, it’s that unless you let me know that I’m doing well, I won’t know. One of my former bosses never said anything about my performance, so I never knew where I stood. And with his rigid expressions, it was impossible to know if you were kickin’ butt…or just floating along.

Mr. Boss·some let employees know when we did things wrong…privately.
Have you ever been berated in front of your colleagues? It’s not a good time. Mr. Boss·some knew the importance of discretion and dealt with delicate situations confidentially.

Mr. Boss·some didn’t micromanage.
If you’re going to hire people, why not trust them to do their job? Being hands-off, but available when your employee has a questions or concerns, just sets the tone for a healthy boss/ employee relationship.

Mr. Boss·some was realistic about expectations.
Remember that volcano in Iceland that exploded in 2010? My friend’s boss was stuck abroad, and was frustrated this his flight was cancelled due to THE VOLCANO EXPLODING, yet he called my friend at 6am on a Sunday to insist that she somehow find him a flight out of there. Apparently he thought my friend possessed magical powers. Thankfully my Mr. Boss·some was sensible in his expectations for deadlines, workflows, and volcanic hazards.

Having a Bloss is a total drag but it makes you appreciate the Mr. Boss·somes of the world.
We’ve all had a Bloss at some point throughout our careers. You fantasize about publishing their rude emails or snotty iChats across the internet so everyone can see how awful they are. You imagine setting their computer on fire. You think about deleting a very important part of their server files. But you don’t because karma. And because when you work for your Mr. Boss·some, and you are thanked and appreciated, the workplace universe equilibrium has been restored, and when the time comes, you know how to be Boss·some.

My Friends Are All…And I’m All…(Part 2)

Ok, it’s time to wipe away the dust from my beloved little blog, and pick things up with a little dose of Vitamin Truth.

My friends are all, “Woo, summer’s here!” and I’m all, “Woo, summer’s here!”

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My friends are all, “Got the cutest new suit!” and I’m all, “Capris & a tank count as a two-piece, yeah?”

My friends are all, “Time for a new car!” and I’m all, “Time for a new car!”

My friends are all, “Just got in on that new tech IPO” and I’m all, “Mah shiny savings account is immune to the market crash.”

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My friends are all, “Loving my new Neiman Marcus curtains!” and I’m all, “These vertical blinds really add a touch of class to my living room.”

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Vertical Blinds.jpeg

My friends are all, “Dinner party 4TW” and I’m all, “Who’s down for a BBQ?”

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My friends are all, “Finally Baby Chloe slept through the night!” and I’m all, “Princess Meow Paws woke Mommy up for nom noms at 5am.”

My friends are all, “#OfficeVibes” and I’m all, “#OfficeVibes.”

My friends are all, “#MondayMotivation” and I’m all, “Need to Google ‘Saving compooter from coffee death’ but currently have compooter dying a coffee death.”

My friends are all, “Abs Day!” and I’m all, “Plz to send halp!”

On The Prowl For A New Job? The Rumor Is True: It’s All Who You Know

job referrals

When you’re hunting for work, your instincts urge you to spend 24/7 on LinkedIn, to incessantly investigate every online job board, and to send out a billion resumes because “it’s all a numbers game.”

Sure, there can be some worth in the digital hustle, but I found the true magic sauce: referrals.

Get this: every job I’ve scored throughout the last 13 years has been through a referral.

No joke. Every employment opportunity, both staff and freelance, has been because of connections I’ve made. I only discovered this a few weeks ago, when I carefully traced a path along my career trajectory to investigate how I ended up at my current gig (aka heaven on earth…well, heaven in downtown, anyway).

When I moved to Los Angeles circa 2003, I needed a job as quickly as possible, which meant either waiting tables or selling fruit on Hollywood Blvd. I scoured Craigslist and found a post for some local catering company that needed servers. (Ok, fine, that’s the ONLY job I didn’t get through a referral, but I didn’t  know anyone at the time, so it doesn’t count.) I shudder to think about how I looked in those pleated tuxedo pants and cummerbund. Spoiler alert: I looked like a chubby panda bear sporting a ponytail.

During training, I met a cool guy from the east coast and we became fast friends. Casey and I laughed our way through countless shifts and I sulked when he quit a couple months later. He started working at an outdoor restaurant in downtown L.A and immediately got me an interview with the manager. Time to burn that cummerbund!

And so it began…

Exhibit #1 – HI, MAY I TAKE YOUR ORDER?

For the next 2.5 years, I doled out cheeseburgers, greasy quesadillas, and forced smiles. I went through a few hundred pens, dozens of lost wine keys, and thousands of white collared shirts. The more double-shifts I powered through, the more I wondered what to do with my life. Eventually Casey moved on again, but this time he called with exciting news: the post-production company next to his new job needed a receptionist and he could easily get me an interview. I knew nothing about post-production, but I was desperate to hang up my apron and not smell like stale food scraps all the time.

Exhibit #2 – POST-PRODUCTION + THE 7 YEAR ITCH

Thrilled to toss out my putrid outfits and psyched for my new (albeit longer) commute, I started with typical receptionist duties like phones, lunch, errands and coffee runs. Over time, my responsibilities multiplied, and 7 years later I’d worked my way up to Business Manager. The steady employment allowed me a sense of stability, but I kept thinking I was destined to do something else. After some soul searching and tons of research, I decided to go back to school. I picked a certificate program at UCLA Extension and told my bosses about the plan. Though they assured me that I could attend school and reduce my hours with no threat to my employment, they let me go a few weeks later. I like to think that I got the axe because they wanted me to have more time for homework.

Exhibit #3 – PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN HIP HIP HOLLYWOOD

Suddenly unemployed, I panicked about my lack of income but loved every moment of school. I sat up front for every lecture and lapped up the lessons like a thirsty puppy. I even griped to my new favorite professor about needing a job. Amazingly, he knew of an opening at a cool branding company in Hollywood and said he’d put in a good word for me. The following week I met with the owner of the agency and BOOM – I began working as a part-time Project Manager. I handled website launches, oversaw design projects, dealt with clients, and learned tons about digital. As much as I enjoyed the folks I worked with, I slowly realized that I wanted to be on the creative side of things. I wanted to write. Later that year, I (dubiously) submitted my resignation in order to enter the freelance writing game.

Exhibit  #4 – FREELANCE PANTS + WAITRESSING 2.0

While I worked on building a solid portfolio, I needed supplementary dough, so I begrudgingly waited tables at the same downtown restaurant from 10 years prior. (How’s that for life coming full-circle?) Even though the apron came with a sense of contempt, this time I knew that waitressing was merely a means to an end, and only temporary. Now I had direction. I had goals. So I polished silverware, grinned through bad gratuities, and enthusiastically folded napkins. I took on side gigs from various clients (all referrals!) and developed a collection of writing samples that I adored. About 11 months later, that rad professor from UCLA got hired at a production company, and got me an interview for a position on his team. Fun fact: the CEO was intrigued that I had video jingles in my portfolio and during my interview he requested that I perform one live. I felt terribly awkward but he loved it and asked me to start on Monday.

Exhibit #5 – AN EXERCISE IN DIGITAL FUTILITY

As a Content Producer on the brand new digital team, I showed up with a shiny attitude and a yearning to utilize all the knowledge I’d amassed over the years. In the beginning, I got to manage a few website launches, write a bunch of fun articles, and interview hilarious comedians for the company’s syndicated TV show. Unfortunately, the company wasn’t really ready to go digital, so eventually my team dispersed in search of new opportunities. A sweet coworker knew that I was seeking a fresh creative opportunity, and set me up with an interview at a very cool tech start-up in the pet industry. The clouds parted. A golden ray of sunshine peeked into my life.

Exhibit #6 – PURRFECTION

Digital + writing + pets + tech = paradise. I’m happy as a kitten in a cargo of catnip. As a dog with a bucket of bacon. As a grateful gal at her dream job.

So therein lies the assortment of job referrals that brought me here. Word-of-mouth has been my best form of self-promotion. If you have the chance, I urge you to always recommend friends and colleagues for employment opportunities. And hopefully they will do the same. Because the adage is true: it’s all who you know.

Battle Of The Nighttime Nags – A Dialogue Between A Girl And Her Brain

Slide1

FADE IN:

INT. BEDROOM – NIGHT

Moonlight peeks through the vertical blinds, illuminating 3 sleeping cats on the giant bed. A frazzled, angry brunette lies awake, staring despondently at the digital clock beside her. 3:28am. A loud, annoying voice startles her.

BRAIN:
Oh hey! Sorry to wake you. But did you hear that noise coming from the living room?

KIM: (sitting up)
No. What was it?

BRAIN:
Probably the cat knocking something off the counter.

KIM:
But all the cats are in here.

BRAIN:
So it’s probably a machete-wielding lunatic here to murder you and kill the cats.

KIM:
Ohmygawd.

BRAIN:
Just kidding. It’s fine. Go back to sleep. You know, if you fall asleep right now, you can sneak in another 3 hours and 32 minutes.

KIM:
Good. Shut up so I can go back to sleep.

BRAIN:
Ok, ok….hey maybe that noise was your loud bodybuilder neighbor upstairs. He’s probably doing naked pushups in the living room.

KIM:
If I looked like him, I probably would too. But not at 3:30 in the morning. Now shut up!

BRAIN:
Fine, just let the sound of your fan drown me out. Having white noise is supposed to help you sleep. But have you noticed that the blades of the fan are spinning around kinda unevenly, and it’s making a weird scraping sound? Might wanna get that fixed. Or buy a new fan.

KIM:
Cool. I’ll be sure to do that next weekend. Please stop talking.

BRAIN:
But aren’t you insanely thirsty?

KIM: (groan)
Ugh. Yeah, actually I am. But I’m too lazy to get out of bed.

BRAIN:
Well, good, cuz the only things in your fridge are white wine and stale chipotle mayo.

KIM:
F*ck.

BRAIN:
Hey, speaking of wine, remember the time you got wasted at that cute restaurant on 3rd street and developed a drunken case of kleptomania?

KIM:
It was a candle. And I wasn’t that drunk.

BRAIN:
Still. Who goes into a bathroom, blows out the incredible-smelling candle by the sink, and shoves it into their purse?

KIM:
Please. It probably cost them a dollar. And I got wax all over my purse.

BRAIN:
Karma, betch. You sure you don’t want to get up and get a glass of tap water?

KIM:
I’d rather shrivel up from dehydration. OH SH*T…I forgot to pay the water bill last week.

BRAIN:
Eh, don’t worry. You’ll just have to pay an exorbitant late fee. Speaking of water, how much longer is this stupid drought gonna last?

KIM:
Yeah, it’s whack. I may have to move back to the east coast. Perhaps I can think about that tomorrow, PROVIDED I GET SOME F***IN SLEEP TONIGHT!

BRAIN:
I can’t believe how warm it is there. Hey, remember that guy Dan you dated in 7th grade? I wonder if he ever found out that you cheated on him with his cousin.

KIM:
Who cares?

BRAIN:
You should probably get up and find him on Facebook and see what he’s been up to.

KIM:
F*ck that. I’m getting up and finding Xanax.

BRAIN:
Fine, but good luck waking up at 7.

KIM:
I hate you.

Kim furiously whips off the covers and settles in front of the TV with a pile of cheese.

FADE OUT.